Why I’m Voting Conservative

As a young person whose political allegiances lie with the Conservatives I have received a lot of abuse. The most common accusations and comments I’ve received are usually along the lines of calling me rich and selfish. Personal insults have also been thrown, however, in my eyes these do not hold any sort of standing as they are not political arguments and are instead attacks on me for daring to hold a different opinion. It’s often too difficult to respond with short answers as the reasons I identify as a Conservative are too long and complex to be broken down into small responses.

Before I start I’m going to state categorically – I don’t hate the poor or the disabled and I would not describe myself as selfish (except in terms of food, I’m sure most of my friends including the ones who hold different political opinions would back me up on this).

I’ll also state that this post isn’t a way for me to try and force my opinions on anybody else, this is simply a post in which I explain my opinions and hopefully those that disagree will be able to understand why I shall be voting Conservative.

It’s also important in any functioning democracy for everyone to hold slightly or completely different opinions, values and political ideologies. I welcome different opinions and learning about different political ideologies. This is how we hold whoever is in government to account and aim to create a better society for everyone.

My core values are small government, low taxes, low welfare and greater personal responsibility. Although not all of these align completely with the Conservatives (especially under Theresa May) it is definitely the party I align with and believe in the most.

To me the Conservative party is about aspiration, I believe that anyone anywhere with the right mindset and hard work can achieve. Obviously that’s not the case for everyone and those people should be given our support. I know so many people who have come from disadvantaged backgrounds and have used that as motivation to take control of their own future and achieve. The image below is one of my favourite campaign posters.

John Major - They made him Prime Minister

I don’t hate the poor, I grew up in a working class household where my mum who was single at the time struggled to support us. After working hard to get a promotion at work (she works in the public sector) things began to improve and improved even more when she married my stepdad as obviously two wages are better than one. I accept that things don’t always happen that way, some people work their arses off and struggle to make ends meet and that is wrong.

I have lived in a poor environment, a well off environment and now in a poor environment again. I don’t put that down to the government. I put that down to poor budgeting and sometimes these things happen.

As soon as I was 16 my parents told me that if I didn’t get a job they would not fund anything and would not buy me anything, they expected me to earn money if I wanted nice things and as I worked they did not mind subsidising things I was unable to afford. If I wanted anything I had to work for it. I am so grateful that my parents instilled these values into me.

I vehemently disagree with individuals being handed out benefits by the dozen, I disagree with a large welfare state. A fellow Conservative described the philosophy with a succinct phrase – “Hand up, not hand out”. In my opinion it’s wrong that people that sit at home all day scrounging off the state can actually earn more than those people who work. I agree that the Conservatives have made mistakes; cutting disability benefits being one of those mistakes. Those who genuinely can’t work should be given help and support, they are vulnerable and must be looked after. Those who can work and choose not to should not receive any financial support, people who work hard should not fund the lives of those who can’t be arsed. A large welfare state encourages failure, plenty of people do not see the value in working because they can (I’m not going to use the word earn because they don’t EARN their money) receive more money by not working. The Conservative party (although they make mistakes) acknowledge this, hence why they reduced the benefits cap down to £23K in London and £20K elsewhere. I agree that mistakes have been made that will impact the most vulnerable in our society and those decisions were wrong. But I would also like to add that several people have stated that they received the help they need because of a Conservative government, not in spite of it. However, to me the Labour party increases the welfare state, it keeps those who are poor poor and encourages the mindset that everyone else is to blame. As I stated above the Conservative party to me and pretty much every other Conservative member is the party of aspiration. We take responsibility for ourselves, I recognise that I’m the only one who can take control and improve my life.

Another reason why I support the Conservatives is that they are (mainly, not always and when they’re not it pisses me off) the party of low taxes. They believe that working people should take home more of what they earn and hand less over to the state. I believe in keeping taxes as low as possible. A high-tax state (if of course the tax is too high) usually results in people leaving the country and gives people more of an incentive to avoid/evade tax (obviously regardless of the tax rate some people will still attempt to do this but you get my point).

A Conservative led government increased the personal allowance from £6,475 to £11,500, hundreds of thousands if not millions of people have been taken out of paying income tax all together. As of 2015 this meant that 26 million people are now keeping more of their own money. David Cameron actually proposed (I’m not quite sure if it has been implemented because of his resignation and other external factors) to raise it further meaning that those working 30 hours a week on minimum wage pay no income tax at all.

I disagree with increasing taxes on the rich, to me it seems bizarre that we should be punishing people who have worked hard and earn more. Most people that are earning large wages have not simply walked into that role, they’ve worked extremely hard and therefore should not be punished for simply earning more. It punishes aspiration. Yes a lot of people on low incomes work hard as well and that links to my point above. The rich are already paying their fair share. More than a quarter of income tax is paid by the top 1% of earners, and 90% of income tax is paid by the top 50% of earners. I cannot understand the mindset of people thinking they are actually entitled to other peoples money.

Next, I believe in free market capitalism. This involves the laws and forces of supply and demand being free from intervention of the government. It is a result of recognising a need, followed by the need being met. I believe the less government intervention, the more free we all are – “The freer the market, the freer the people”.

This leads me onto my next point, I abhor Socialism. I cannot even begin to describe just how much I disagree with it. I profusely disagree with handing more power over to government. I have a lot of strong opinions and views on Socialism and why I disagree with it etc but that is for another post.

I also believe that the greatest solution to poverty and maintaining public services is a strong economy. The Conservative party helps to encourage investment into the country by reducing corporation tax from 28% in 2010 to 17% by 2020. In the current uncertain climate after Brexit we must provide businesses with an incentive to invest in our country to ensure the highest chances of economic success.

To sum up, I believe that the Conservative party is the party of aspiration, it encourages success. It helps our country to have a strong economy. It allows us to be patriotic and also traditional in some areas whilst also being progressive where needed. I am more than willing to acknowledge the governments failures and mistakes. It is inevitable that every government will make mistakes, and that is the beauty of democracy; if the government pisses us off we can simply get rid of them at the next election.

I know a lot of points were missed out and over simplified but I know already that this is a very long post and I feel as though I have rambled on enough and people get the idea. I may write another post in the future regarding some of the missed issues but for now I feel that this is enough.

I’ll add one of my favourite quotes below…

“You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity by legislating the wealthy out of prosperity. What one person receives without working for another person must work for without receiving. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for that my dear friend is the beginning of the end of any nation. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it.” – Adrian Rogers

Ta,

Emily x

 

 

 

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57 thoughts on “Why I’m Voting Conservative

  1. Mark pepper says:

    What a great blog,i shall look forward to reading more from you.you share my own views as i regard myself a social conservative who believes in fairness and why should those who work subsidise others that feel they are entitled to it.

    Like

      • Michael Lake says:

        I actually agree with a lot of what you have to say too. I think people should work and people should be incentivised to work. Those who cannot should not suffer either.
        I believe though, that benefits scroungers are a drop in the ocean compared to other pressures on our public finances. In work benefits cost the taxpayer significantly more than out of work benefits. Income support alone costs 40% more than Jobseekers Allowance.
        Employers should not receive state support through in work benefits. If their business cannot thrive without paying people who work for them enough to get off state handouts then their business deserves to fail or be nationalised if it’s a vital a public service like transport. That’s a free market. That’s capitalism. We are more alike than you realise but I will be voting Labour for all the reasons you will vote Conservative.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Josh Pettit says:

    “I believe that anyone anywhere with the right mindset and hard work can achieve. Obviously that’s not the case for everyone …”

    Like

  3. James says:

    Josh,
    Because there are no absolutes in politics, and pretty much anything, so often there are exceptions to every rule of thumb. We use generalisations to simplify very complex issues but we mustn’t lose touch that generations are just that.

    The vast majority of people are capable of some work, and that work builds self-worth; therefore this should be supported.

    The thing that bothers me is the idea that disabled people are so incapable that they must be given everything by the state. Why should we not expect someone to not work just because they are disabled? If their disability prevents work then we should look after them. But to assume that they cannot work is demeaning and callous because it says they are useless and cannot have the self-worth of taking care of themselves. Try telling Dame Tanni GT that she should stay at home and be looked after by the state.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Terra says:

    Thank you for sharing this.
    Though I don’t agree with a number of your points and will be voting Labour myself, a friend of my linked this into my otherwise a very left leaning echo chamber of a Facebook feed and have found it very interesting to see things from the other perspective.

    Liked by 2 people

    • politicalemily says:

      Hi! It’s always good to hear other peoples perspectives, I enjoy it! It’s often hard when some people won’t have reasonable conversations! I’d love to hear your points of view. Obviously not everyone is going to share the same values but that’s the beauty of democracy. Thank you for reading x 😊

      Like

  5. Tom says:

    All the good things you claim the tories did was actually in the lib dem manifesto back when they were in power with the tories. Since then we’ve seen the Tories make the national debt 7x higher, productivite drop to the lowest in UK history (apart from the wars), May u turn on every choice, fighting between the hard right and soft right within the tory party while putting the public at risk, strikes across all sectors of public services, babies lying on chairs in the NHS, uni fees get higher, lack of real investment in the education sector leaving many teachers feel unsupported and leaving their position. The list of things they’ve done wrong is endless and we’re set for another 5 years of it. They have already brought this country to their knees, so sure, why not vote for them again.

    So, sure, vote tory if you wish. I hold nothing against anyone who does. However, when they get back into power force a ruthless exit from the EU and fail to provide for the people like they already have, don’t complain about it. It’s what you voted for.

    Like

    • politicalemily says:

      I agree about the Lib Dems however in a coalition they had to work with the Conservatives and these things would not have passed without the Conservative.
      In regards to your national debt point, we are unable to bring down the national debt until we bring down the deficit. We wouldn’t be able to pay for things like the NHS, education etc without borrowing because y’know we have a deficit.

      Like

      • Tom says:

        And with their current awful record, you think the tories will tackle the deficit? It’s fine to borrow, but if you don’t borrow with a means or plan to pay back that money – thus tackling the deficit – you’re just adding more debt. The way it should be working is by investing in skills, technology etc. But not the the tories. That’s not how they do it.

        Like

      • Edward Daunt says:

        Very interesting blog. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Such a shame so many people confuse debt & deficit. As you’ve stated, clearly the debt can’t start to stop until the deficit becomes a surplus. In 2010 it was £153.5bn & by.2017 it had dropped to £43.1bn. GDP has risen by v+£0.5tn over same period so clearly progress has been made.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Kim Tan says:

    Why I’m voting Labour.

    A letter from a paramedic to Theresa May. (Warning: quite graphic.)

    I joined the Ambulance Service in 1986. For over 28 years I worked doing “Front Line” work. That’s Emergency work. Covering 999 calls. For the last 6 years of my service I worked alone predominantly on nights at weekend so I could care for my mum who had cancer. At night I would be covering 80,000 people alone. In that time I undertook significant training. Advancing myself in skills and knowledge. I became a Paramedic in 1992.

    A Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support instructor, I trained new entrants on the road for over 16 years. I became an Hems Paramedic on the Thames Valley Air Ambulance dealing with Major System Trauma incidents . I’ve dealt with royalty and the lowest sections of society. Film stars, Rock Stars, Serial Killers, Drug Addicts, I’ve been stabbed twice, punched, spat at. Had vomit thrown in my face. Had ribs broken by being kicked by a hypoglycemic patient. Been called a c*nt and worse, been held at gun point as a hostage even had a man try and bite my nose off. Been to major shootings. Helped guide 60+ babies into life. Seen countless people at the very end of their journey.

    I’m trained to cannulate people to administer drugs, intubate, defibrillate , put chest drains in, I’ve put a trachyoctomy on a 16 year old boy hit by a train, tried to resuscitate two burnt toddlers after their father set fire to them both. I’ve seen things that no one should have to witness

    At the end of that time with all that experience I was worth £12.35 an hour before tax (this was my bank shift rate on my very last shift, somewhat lower than my colleagues due to not getting anti social enhancements but even with I feel we are criminally underpaid for the work we undertake). That’s what my skills are worth to society.

    Yes £12.35 before tax and National Insurance. Tax is something the super rich avoid. Why because modern society puts no value on me because I don’t make money. I’m not a footballer or a bean counter for the banks. I don’t fit into the capitalist system that we are all brainwashed to think is the only workable system humanity can live by.

    So go ahead and vote for the Tories again and see the NHS finally die. Let them take away the last decent thing we have left in this country that cuts across all races, ages, and class.
    The great institution that our grand parents fought through the horror of the Second World War to set up “from cradle to the grave”.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. yael arbel says:

    Thank you for this thoughtful post. You said it’s unfair that “people that sit at home all day scrounging off the state can actually earn more than those people who work”.
    In response to this, what is your view on Labour’s proposal to raise the minimum wage? A growing number of people who work must use food banks under the Tory government because regulations on fair employment are so loose and take the employers’ side (e.g. zero hours contracts that also mean people struggle to claim benefits to support them).

    The ideology of personal responsibility is inspiring, but in reality big businesses are the ones who are constantly relying on the state to hand out tax payers’ money (e.g. privatising schools, hospitals and railways and get away with tax dodging). Are you supporting the Conservative ideology or their actual actions?

    Like

    • politicalemily says:

      In response to Labour’s proposal to raise the minimum wage I would be for it in theory. However, I do think it could also have disastrous effects as many small businesses simply cannot afford to pay staff those kinds of wages. I think it could potentially lead to larger businesses trying to relocate or cutting the amount of jobs they advertise and have in an attempt to cut costs and ensure they’re not losing profits. Or businesses will have to increase the prices of their products to cater for the change in their expenses.

      Like

      • Tom says:

        Raising the mini wage is pointless – it’s not a living wage, so I refuse to call ot that – It just creates an endless cycle of wages going up, so products and services go up for companies to match it or they’ll just employ less people.

        A better solution would be to help those struggling in other means. Affordable housing to buy not waste money on rent, educational programs to better their prospects – and thus the country. We should help those at the bottom, but simply throwing money at them (regardless of how much or little) won’t help.

        Liked by 1 person

    • politicalemily says:

      Oh and I support a mixture of both their ideology and actions. I recognise their mistakes but I also identify with them more than any other party. I would love to see the party take a more libertarian route

      Like

  8. ER says:

    Hi Emily.

    It was jntetesting to resd your blog, thanks for sharing.

    The bit I really disagree with is that this country currently provides a level playing field for anybody who wants to succeed and that hard work will get you there. Some of the most hardworking people I know (7 days a week, 12 hours a day) are being paid far below minimum wage in informal employment arrangements – a black market that has flourished in poor and racially diverse areas since Tory government got in, precisely due to a shrinking of government. Cuts to local authorities and the police mean there is little regulation of this and people are working harder than you can imagine simply to be exploited.

    The other thing that really blocks people having the financial security they should have through the amount of work they do is the rental market and cost of living. Again, I knows many families paying through their teeth for substandard accommodation which affects their and their children’s health with no recourse to justice and nowhere else to go. Again, there is no effective regulation of this.

    The intersections of class and race that keep people poor are well documented and I don’t feel that the market economy alone can challenge this. It’s about profit not about equality. If we didn’t live in a world where racism and exploitation and black markets existed it might stand a better chance. But we do. And the only reaponse we can have to that is to regulate it. And the only people that can do that are a properly funded state.

    I want nothing more than for some of my friends to see the benefit of their hard work and be rewarded but they don’t live in that world. Which is why I’ll be voting Labour.

    Thanks for the chat

    Ellie

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Tom says:

    I enjoyed reading your post and I agree with a lot of what you say about working hard and encouraging aspiration in people to succeed. I disagree with your views on taxation though and why you feel the Conservative government is fair. I work in the NHS and my wages have not gone up for 3 years now. In fact I’ve had a pay cut thanks to inflation. And of course I’m worried about my future employment with the inevitable creeping privatisation thanks to Jeremy Hunt and Theresa May. Labour offer a bit of hope for my future and the future healthcare of the nation. If I had to, I would pay a little more to keep our society healthy by maintaining a universal healthcare system ran by the government. What’s your perspective on this Emily?

    Like

    • politicalemily says:

      I understand your concerns. Honestly, I can’t stand Jeremy Hunt. I hoped when Theresa May became PM she would realise how damaging he has been. There are Doctors and ex NHS staff amongst the Conservative MPs and their skills and knowledge within that area should be utilised. The thing is about public sector jobs is that they will always suffer during periods of cuts, my mum is in the police and is getting fed up of not getting a pay rise. She actually cannot abide Theresa May because of what she did as Home Secretary. However, her values do still align with the Conservatives. My stepdad who was in the Police said he would rather not get a pay rise for a few years if it meant the economy gets back on track. I think the NHS needs more than just money being thrown at it, it needs reforming. Charge people who miss appointments and it’ll save time amongst other things. I’m not the most knowledgeable about the NHS and the way it works but I do know that one of the reasons it has been criticised is its top down management culture.
      I hope this comment helps 🙂 thank you for your perspective as well, it was interesting to read 🙂

      Like

  10. Jon Mish says:

    The “scrounged” percentage of welfare budget is an economic insignificant. However the tax avoided by large corporations is enough to upgrade schools, appropriately fund hospitals, support those in need including disabled, and the minute percentage “scroungers”.
    Although it’s a incredibly simple assessment of the situation, I agree with your when you say “I cannot understand the mindset of people thinking they are actually entitled to other peoples money.” On the other hand, *I* cannot understand the mindset of people thinking they are actually entitled to the fruits of other people’s labour. I’m guessing you understand the exploitative nature of extreme capitalism?
    Nobody is saying rich people should be taxed to the hilt but it should be proportionate. The serious damages the tories have done to much needed care services is inasane.
    It’s easy to say “I’m from a working class background and therefore look at me”. You have no idea what other struggles people have to go through. Until you experience that and educate yourself properly, you’ll always have this blinkered view.
    I am from a working class background and have worked I hard into an economically comfortable position. But my personal experience is not representative of all working class. I used to have a very senior position working for a multi-millionaire. My salary kept rising. I had dividends that I was instructed not to pay tax on (although I did). There were hundreds of staff on the bottom rung earning less minimum wage. I knew most were working 70hr weeks on a zero hour contract JUST so they could feed their kids. They got ill. They lost their job. Replaced by other desperate indivuals. While I and other directors
    legally creamed money off the top. I constantly tried to push for salary increases (at least a minimum wage) and got no where. Like you, they had a lack of respect and lack of human understanding and therefore couldn’t see how much damage they were doing. In the end I couldn’t face working with the level of greed. I refused two pay increases and eventually left. These people in charge were and still are stories. These are the people that you naively protect by voting Tories back in.
    Tories don’t look after the nation, they look after their friends and the money pots. Like the miserly Scrooge. Left supporters don’t want communism. They want a fairness. They want a society that isn’t draconian.

    Like

  11. Robin Fishwick says:

    I think there is a blur here between equality and equality of opportunity. Equality is about everybody having a fair share. Equality of opportunity is about everybody having an equal chance of having a greater share than other people. A boy from Brixton did become Prime Minister, but clearly not every boy from Brixton does. You will never create a level playing field, but the whole exercise of creating a level playing field adds to a sense of entitlement felt by the haves, rather than a sense of obligation towards the have nots. Taxes are not an evil. They are not a punishment. They are the way in which out of my prosperity I pay for a healthier society.

    Like

  12. Jonathan Eyre says:

    That is really interesting, thanks. A few myths seem core, specifically ‘ taxation is a punishment for the rich’ when a rich person having to pay £500 or even more extra such as just short of £2000 for some one on £123,000 is as much an issue as someone on low income paying VAT is not mentioned yet proportionally the poor are paying disproportionately more of their income on taxes than the well off and rich……… A big blind spot in your reasoning in your statement in my opinion.

    Like

  13. Kim Tan says:

    Another reason why I won’t vote conservative. I won’t have the country dragged back to the 1930s. From the Daily Mirror:
    Tory deputy mayor: Best thing for disabled children is the guillotine

    A Tory deputy mayor has sparked outrage by calling for disabled kids to be guillotined to avoid wasting cash on their care.

    Retired GP Owen Lister made his sick suggestion to fellow councillors as they discussed sending the youngsters to a £3,000-a-week care home.

    Mr Lister, 79, told them: “I would guillotine them.”

    He has now quit as deputy mayor but yesterday stood by his outburst.

    He said: “I indicated at that point that perhaps the guillotine might be better. These are children you can’t educate.

    “It’s merely a matter of caring for them until they die. The only difference between a terminally ill patient and a severely handicapped child is time.”

    The councillor, of Swindon, Wiltshire, argued the funds should instead be used to cut NHS waiting lists.

    He added: “It shows how peculiar we are as a society on this matter that we spend this vast amount of money caring for disabled youngsters to very little purpose at all.

    “It would be better spent on those who might actually benefit, such as cancer sufferers.”

    Like

  14. MORourke says:

    Interesting read. I have to point out that – ‘small government, low taxes, low welfare and greater personal responsibility’ are not actually values they are beliefs. Values are intrinsic to what drives you – fairness/ openness/ tolerance/compassion/ or
    Greed/ selfishness/ individualism one to consider regardless of what political party you align with!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Neil Seager says:

    Similar to other posters, I am planning on voting for Labour and have been pointed to this by my friends.
    First off: Thank you. It is increasingly difficult for me to see why anyone would vote Conservative, and your clearly written and frank post is of great help in broadening my understanding.

    I also disagree with a fair part of it.

    “It’s also important in any functioning democracy for everyone to hold slightly or completely different opinions, values and political ideologies. I welcome different opinions and learning about different political ideologies. This is how we hold whoever is in government to account and aim to create a better society for everyone.”
    Hear hear! I only wish the Conservatives agreed with you, considering Theresa May’s attempts to clamp down on Press Freedom and Internet Freedoms (see proposed changes to Official Secrets Act, and the new regulation suggested in the Conservative Manifesto).

    “I vehemently disagree with individuals being handed out benefits by the dozen, I disagree with a large welfare state. A fellow Conservative described the philosophy with a succinct phrase – “Hand up, not hand out”. In my opinion it’s wrong that people that sit at home all day scrounging off the state can actually earn more than those people who work.”
    There’s a lot going on in that paragraph.
    A) I do not believe that there’s a lot of ‘benefits being handed out by the dozen’ as I understand your meaning – the myth of the underclass Robin Hood living large with his BMW and Flatscreen TVs and holidays to Magaluf all funded by nebulous ‘benefits’. I know for a fact there are those who cheat the system, and
    manage to basically loaf around doing nothing. Their lives are pretty grim though, stuck in a sort of perpetual teen age, and none of them have the status symbols the Daily Mail typically rails against. I don’t think there’s a lot of benefits claimants doing better than people in work, which leads to point B.
    B) Benefits were calculated on how much a person reasonably can be expected to live on. If people on benefits are doing better than those in work, that has to be some damn bad work. Underemployment, zero-hours contracts and self-employment dodges. Do we concentrate on cleaning up the employment sector, accepting that no matter how tight a means test we
    may have some are always going to cheat any system, or do we punish *everyone* cheat or otherwise, on benefits, by reducing them presumably below the level of funds a person can reasonably expected to live on and ignore the reasons behind the so-called benefits trap? “People don’t want to get out of the pond because the garden is on fire? Better drain
    the pond!” When the conservatives cabinet say they want to Make Work Pay, they mean they want people who aren’t working to suffer.
    C) Some people do deserve to have their benefits stopped. I do know people who earn their £50 a week or whatever by faking not being able to walk (bastards). What about their children, blameless in this? Shall they starve because Daddy is a shirker? What about the genuinely needy, who are far, FAR more likely to be caught by tighter, crueller measures?
    I point at the ATOS debacle, where my best friend from school, rendered a shaking neurotic wreck by the early death of his mother and frequent beatings from his drunken abusive father, received 0/15 on his vulnerability criteria. A man who subsequently, attempting to work as a volunteer one day a week was institutionalised due to a stress induced psychotic
    breakdown.

    “As I stated above the Conservative party to me and pretty much every other Conservative member is the party of aspiration. ”
    So far you’ve not really shown that, just that the Conservatives would rather enact policies that make sure the poorest receive less help than they need and focus on doing so rather than tackling the issues that cause the problems. How does making someone on benefits worse off help someone being underpaid? It’s not reduced tax, as the benefit fraud is a
    tiny percentage, and the changes tend to cost more than they save.

    “We take responsibility for ourselves, I recognise that I’m the only one who can take control and improve my life.”
    I’m glad that you and I are in a position where we can do that. Many aren’t, that’s what benefits are for.

    “Another reason why I support the Conservatives is that they are (mainly, not always and when they’re not it pisses me off) the party of low taxes. They believe that working people should take home more of what they earn and hand less over to the state. I believe in keeping taxes as low as possible. A high-tax state (if of course the tax is too high) usually
    results in people leaving the country and gives people more of an incentive to avoid/evade tax (obviously regardless of the tax rate some people will still attempt to do this but you get my point).”
    Yes, the Conservatives do love to lower taxes, I freely admit it. They also like to cut spending on necessities to make up for it, and gutted Police, Crown Prosecution Service, NHS, Education System in exchange for an extra £500 a year I feel is a false economy. How much will paying at point of contact for Healthcare take from working people? Looking at USA
    style healthcare *a lot*.

    “The rich are already paying their fair share. More than a quarter of income tax is paid by the top 1% of earners, and 90% of income tax is paid by the top 50% of earners.”
    I actually agree we shouldn’t raise tax on the rich. I think we should be enforcing the existing rules and claiming higher tax revenue that way. Many high earners have a pitifully low actual income because, get this, they are technically employing themselves, and paying themselves very low wages. However, as the current government have been strangely reticent
    to pursue this action, we are left with raising taxes. I appreciate it will hurt the Barclays to not to be able to buy a second island with the money their workforce made for them, but taking even small amounts from the poor will cause disproportionate suffering.

    “I cannot understand the mindset of people thinking they are actually entitled to other peoples money.”
    I cannot understand the mindset of people who can literally build mansions to live and buy racing cars for everyday use in while ex-soldiers starve homeless on the streets. Which is a more reasonable position? Again, nobody’s demanding the shirt from your back, but from the perspective of someone who earns under the average wage, there has been precious little
    sign of us being ‘all in it together’.

    “Next, I believe in free market capitalism. This involves the laws and forces of supply and demand being free from intervention of the government. It is a result of recognising a need, followed by the need being met. I believe the less government intervention, the more free we all are – “The freer the market, the freer the people”.”
    It’s fine to believe in something. I personally don’t agree. The Free Market is not an omnipotent deity, and there seems to be no profit in helping the unproductive, like frail elderly people with no money. The Free Market is also very very bad at investing in infrastructure. I believe we need a mix of Capitalism and Socialism, where each can do what they’re
    best at. Where there is the possibility of choice, the free market wins every time. Compare western and soviet cars during the cold war. Where there is no prospect of choice, then there is no reason for innovation. Observe the railways, where people *have* to use them and the companies use ancient rolling stock to provide late trains at horrific prices.
    The Conservatives also appear to support a very strange model of Free Market, where the private sector keeps the profit, and never suffers when it fails to deliver or inevitably runs over budget. See the numerous IT disasters and Virgin Healthcare shenanigans.
    Do you think the analysts and bankers who caused the sub-prime mortgage collapse deserve their multi-million pound bonuses? The Free Market does.

    “This leads me onto my next point, I abhor Socialism. I cannot even begin to describe just how much I disagree with it. I profusely disagree with handing more power over to government. I have a lot of strong opinions and views on Socialism and why I disagree with it etc but that is for another post.”
    Fair enough. I suppose you don’t need it pointed out that a fire on your neighbour’s property can burn down your house? Collective bargaining is vital to protect the rights of the many poor against the few rich. Before we had trades unions, companies would just fire anyone demanding less dangerous work environments. Look at companies like Foxcon in China.

    “I also believe that the greatest solution to poverty and maintaining public services is a strong economy.”
    How’s austerity working out, with it’s “rounding error” growth, compared to Obama’s Stimulus Package economy?

    “The Conservative party helps to encourage investment into the country by reducing corporation tax from 28% in 2010 to 17% by 2020.”
    Fine, in practice. Is it really investment when you channel all your proceeds overseas? Or is it parasitically using a country’s infrastructure and returning practically nothing thanks to the Conservative government’s strange reluctance to clamp down on tax avoidance? See Amazon, Google, sweetheart deals etc.

    “To sum up, I believe that the Conservative party is the party of aspiration, it encourages success. It helps our country to have a strong economy. It allows us to be patriotic and also traditional in some areas whilst also being progressive where needed. I am more than willing to acknowledge the governments failures and mistakes. It is inevitable that every
    government will make mistakes, and that is the beauty of democracy; if the government pisses us off we can simply get rid of them at the next election.”
    I disagree. I think the Conservatives talk a good game when it comes to Aspiration, Strong Economy, Patriotism. However they have delivered misery to the poor, oppression to those who dare question them, a stagnant economy and a rise in jingoism and allowed Russian ex-KGB plutocrats to own our capitol city and kowtowed to the Saudi royals who fund and export Wahabi extremism to the western world.

    The worst part of it is, I believe they know they are making the country a worse place to live for those who aren’t in power and don’t care.

    Thank you for engaging in this conversation, I respect your bravery and if I disagree with your opinions, I would die for your right to have them.
    I hope you will reconsider your position.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Disgruntled says:

    Whilst I share your views on a lot of things, there are reasons why I just cannot vote Conservative, and why I cannot vote of any other party either. I grew up in Sheffield in the 70’s and 80’s. It was bloody difficult. But I wouldn’t change it for the world. It made me what I am today. I used to get bullied a lot because I was good at school, to the point I was stood in the kitchen with a bread knife, crying my eyes out ready to end it. I was 14. I’ve always believed that if you work hard you get the rewards. I did my A levels and instead of going to University, I joined the Forces. It was there I realised that being good is not a bad thing. After 12 years serving my country, I left and have worked in the defence industry ever since, providing equipment for our ever stretched Armed Forces. I have learned to treat everyone and anything with the respect they deserve. Therefore I cannot vote Conservative due to the reduction in disabled benefit, the complete shambles that is the NHS, fox-hunting (really, why is this even being discussed!), the state taking 2/3rds of your house should you require help in later years, and drastically cutting immigration to the point companies will not be able to fill their vacancies A lot of the economic values of the Conservatives are right, but they have got it wrong on so many levels. This country should be low taxes, but spending the taxes in the right way. Not a single party are proposing to do this, so I will be voting “None of the Above”.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. rochellemasquith says:

    This was a really interesting read, so thanks for posting! I read this because I want to know how “the other side” (though I don’t think we should work in sides) thinks – I’m from a working class background, from a mining town, too, so I’m sure you can understand why my area certainly has an almost cultural disdain for the Conservative party. My city was left bereft by the Tories, and there’s a museum in it that lists the names of the people who suffered immensely because of Thatcher and her policies. When Thatcher shut down the mines, she ensured that there was nothing in place to deal with the subsequent mass unemployment, meaning that our cities were bled dry. I feel like a similar thing is happening now, and will continue to happen if the Tories win this next election; the poorest and the most vulnerable in our societies are being taxed excessively, and I know you think the disability cuts etc. are wrong, as you said in your post, but I can’t help but think that you simply don’t understand the devastation that this has wreaked on working class areas. There are so many disabled people who I know that are being declared fit for work despite having debilitating disabilities – one person in particular has to use a wheelchair, and was sent to work in an office with no wheelchair access. When she went back to the job centre and explained what happened, she had her benefits cut and was called lazy. The cuts the government are making spread far deeper and wider than most can imagine. There is nothing in the Conservative manifesto that signifies any kind of desire to rectify the mistakes that they have made regarding the disability cuts and the consequential issues and deaths it has caused. Furthermore, I know for a fact that disadvantage doesn’t motivate. Economic disadvantage, as several studies have proven, makes situations worse and can actually engender disabilities such as depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders. Also, people on benefits are not lazing around at home. Obviously there are probably a few who are taking the piss a bit, but those are an extreme minority. Studies have proven that hand outs and a universal basic income would MASSIVELY encourage employment, productivity, and actually reduce inequality and the consequential neuroses. One particular study that is worth noting is one where some researchers gave some homeless people (I can’t remember the exact number) £1,000. They met up with them a year later to see what had happened, and every single one of them had put in place things to help them, whether it was in investing, putting money down on a flat… Every single one of them was well on their way out of poverty. All because they got a handout. (These studies can be found in Rutger Bregman’s book Utopia for Realists). One of the main reasons why I think handouts and decent benefits are such a good idea, is because, frankly, I think it is a good thing to help people in need, regardless of how they got there, regardless of how “deserving” I might think they are. We’re dealing with human beings here, not machines to be profited from. Taxing high earners isn’t a punishment, and what the Labour party are proposing isn’t a higher division between the poor and the rich; in fact what they are proposing is more social mobility, and a fairer distribution of wealth. Please respond to this as I’d like to continue this discussion – I think it’s a really valuable one!

    Liked by 1 person

    • politicalemily says:

      Hey, thank you! I understand your comments about mining as some of my family members (albeit they’re dead now as they were mainly great grandparents) were miners. One of them was a staunch Labour supporter and the other was a staunch Conservative. They both experienced Thatcher shutting down the mines. I obviously can’t really comment much on mining as I wasn’t born until 1998 and don’t really know much about it. However, I have spoken to a few people who were around during that time and I have learn that Wilson and Callaghan (I think it was those two I’m trying to remember off the top of my head) shut more mines down than Thatcher ever did. I didn’t really understand why she did what she did either but I have been taught/told that it was cheaper to buy coal from places such as Holland than it was to dig for it in our own country. Then the unions demanded over and above inflation pay rises for years and held the country to ransom until they got them. Thatcher then demanded that production was increased and then stockpiled the coal for the next strike, so when unions made their demands she said no. Some of the stuff she did was good and some bad but sometimes she had to make seemingly bad decisions for the good of the country, although I do think it was wrong of her to ensure there was nothing in place (this is just what I’ve been taught so forgive me if it’s wrong). The disability benefits is a difficult one, I know some that have had their benefits cut wrongly and although one boy I know is able to work despite his disability he simply cannot get a job as employers don’t want him, I think in the cases of the disabled that can work the government need to provide businesses with incentives to hire those with disability. I also know those with disabilities that are more than happy with the amount they are paid and in fact say it was the Conservative government that gave them the help they need. The example you’ve just told me about is obviously wrong and I disagree with the way she was treated entirely. I think it’s ATOS that conducts the fit for work assessments? Correct me if it’s not them, please. But I know ATOS was introduced by Labour and the government are just following what is in place. I’m gonna say I’m not particularly impressed overall with the Conservative manifesto, I do like some things but not others, they’re becoming more and more centrist in my opinion in an attempt to win over even more traditional Labour voters who have become disillusioned with the party. If I could change certain aspects of the manifesto I would (if I could) recommend that the stance they have taken with disability benefits be reformed so that those who are in genuine need get the help. I don’t think it’s fair to write off disabled people though because I know a lot can work, it’s just having a better system in place really. I’ll disagree slightly with the economic disadvantage point as there’s so many people I know who have come from disadvantaged backgrounds and used that as motivation because they don’t want their future to be the same, some are at university studying extremely difficult subjects whilst some have started careers in medicine etc. I think more should be taken into account with the benefits system as in my personal situation my boyfriends basic salary is £27K however he has a company car and after tax on fuel and income tax etc he only gets just under £18K a year which when taking bills and everything else into account is very difficult for 2 people to live on and most months we’ll go hungry at the end, but because of his basic income we don’t qualify for income support. I understand the mental health point as I’ve been diagnosed with both Depression and Anxiety and I struggle with them every day, some days/weeks worse than others, I know how hard it is in terms of motivation because that’s why I’m so behind at college this year haha. I also agree that more needs to be done to tackle homelessness but I’m not sure whether charities would be more productive with that. On your benefits point it’s hard because I don’t think people who don’t work should be earning more than those who do work, it sort of diminishes the motivation to work in some cases because they’d actually be better not working. I’d like to see those who claim benefits and are able to do community service in order to receive their payments. I do think people deserve help but I also think personal responsibility plays a part. Finally, in response to your point on taxation the reduction in corporation tax has actually generated nearly £90bn in revenue. Lower taxation usually results in an increase in revenue if you find the correct balance. Higher taxation encourages evasion/avoidance and discourages investment. I think people should be able to keep more of what they earn and I do think that the rich are taxed too highly as it is but that’s just because I’d like to see people keep more of their money. Wealth distribution to me doesn’t stand out as an issue however I think what is an issue is ensuring that those at the bottom also have a good standard of living which is definitely something that needs to be looked at. As I said in an earlier point I’m not over the moon about some aspects of the Conservative manifesto, there are lots of things I’d get rid of, lots of things I would introduce and lots of things I would alter slightly! 🙂

      Like

      • Gia says:

        The conservatives are scrapping those incentives for employers to employ the disabled.

        I don’t think the majority of voters would disagree with the majority of what you have posted here but it’s ideology at the end of the day, we have to deal with the realities of life under this tory government.

        They have implemented laws and cuts which have damaged people’s lives and our rights – (working rights, privacy rights for example.)

        Corporations and mega rich should not be able to avoid tax whilst this government targets the most vulnerable in society and minimum wage is stagnant whilst inflation is at a high and cost of living is rising.

        I cannot vote for them. They are not in the interest of the ordinary working person and people who really do need help.

        I will never forget reading about the many people who have died directly or indirectly due to tory cuts and being declared “fit for work” when they certainly aren’t and then died not long after. This is not acceptable. I NEVER heard of this happening before the tories took power. Our society should take pride in caring for our most vulnerable.

        The NHS and social care are in a mess and nothing is being done about it. Our elderly care is very poor. These have been people who have fought in World War Two, they deserve SO MUCH BETTER. I am so angry about what happened with my grandfather who suffered from dementia. I haven’t heard one word about what they are doing or going to do to improve the NHS, social care and elderly care, I suspect this is because as conservatives they naturally don’t believe in “socialist” things such as this. All I hear from conservatives is this ; “strong and stable” mantra which is meaningless and untrue, “coalition of chaos” again just another soundbite, Jeremy Corbyn so called “links” with ira which seems to be what they are pinning their whole election on, fox hunting, taking your home away after you die and have needed social care due to ill health in old age, after working hard, paying taxes all your life and saving for a home and better future for your famiy. £100,000 is what they will allow you to keep – The Conservative Bow Group disapprove and described it as “the biggest stealth tax in history”. It’s wrong and it will affect tory voters.

        I cannot trust them with the NHS. Doctors, and other NHS staff have made a video currently circulating twitter begging people not to vote tory because of the effects they are having on the NHS – these people work there everyday they are highly experienced, intelligent and see the problems first hand – does that not concern you? There is a doctor standing for election in an attempt to unseat jeremy hunt. I think they know what is happening with the NHS better than us.

        My local library in the next town has been shut. My bus the ONLY public transport in my village axed, this left some people with no way to get to work and college. Roads full of potholes. Nearest A and E closed, next one is in crisis with the amount of people it now has to deal with.

        My local tory mp has a voting record that i disagree with, has faced a number of sexual assult allegations from his employees, one of which still ongoing.

        I am not happy with any political party totally to be honest. I have to vote labour because of my constituency, I do not want the tories. At least labour and Corbyn care about ordinary people and definitely don’t want Theresa May to win with a huge majority wiping out all opposition in parliament. That’s not good.

        My number one issue is health and social care. My second issue is our rights.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. rochellemasquith says:

    I’d just like to clarify a point because I think you misunderstood me – when I talked about a universal basic income, I didn’t mean that people on benefits should be getting more money than those who are working. It’s ridiculous if that is happening, it goes without saying. I understand that a low income can be motivating, but what I don’t understand is why that income has to be so low, and this includes workers, too. The Conservatives have never ever worked for a fairer distribution of wealth, and a fairer distribution of wealth would solve a lot of the world’s problems. May would happily see us heading back to Dickensian times with her taxation policies that basically involve stealing from the poor and giving to the rich. I think you’re forgetting that we are currently under a Tory government, and your boyfriend’s high tax was David Cameron’s idea. The Conservatives have been in power for years now yet they’re acting like it isn’t their fault that the country’s a mess. It’s deeply unfair that people like David Cameron get to evade tax whilst the poorest of us starve. It is clear that we’ve grown into a society that cares far more about an individual narrative rather than a collective narrative. Wanting poor children to have free school meals, wanting refugees to be treated with compassion and care, and wanting the less fortunate to be able to live with dignity, are being seen as lefty loony ideas rather than basic human rights. It is my view that because you are a human on this planet you should be given a home, healthcare and an education, and it disturbs me that the pursuit of money has distorted this perception to more right wing compassionless ideals. Frankly, if I were on a far higher income, I’d happily see my money go to funding hospitals, schools, community centres, benefits for the vulnerable, rather than it being left sitting in my pocket whilst others suffer. Basically, Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol.

    Here are some interesting TED talks: https://youtu.be/aIL_Y9g7Tg0

    Like

    • politicalemily says:

      No I get what you meant! I was just discussing the benefits cap at I think it’s £23K in London and £21K elsewhere. I don’t know about the policy affecting my boyfriends tax but I’ll definitely having a look into it! In terms of the free school meals I don’t think they should be universal. There are measures in place that ensure that those in need can get free school meals. I disagree with Labour’s free school lunches for everyone AND Conservative’s free school breakfasts for everyone. I don’t think those who can afford to pay should get free school meals, if they can afford it then it’s the parents responsibility to feed their child not the schools. I agree refugees should be treated with compassion however whilst there are still issues with homelessness for our own citizens I don’t think we can take so many refugees and that feeds into the housing as well. More social housing needs to be built (i think that’s also in the Con manifesto). I understand what you’re saying about if you were on a far higher income! But in a lot of these areas there are so many resources wasted and money wasted. One of the biggest issues with the NHS is the top-down management culture. I think I’ll be putting some more posts up soon about both Con and Lab manifestos and my thoughts on them both that will probably go into more detail on certain issues. I’ll have a look at those TED talks when I’m home, there are some really interesting ones!

      Like

  19. Lee says:

    The reality is the conservatives are spending more on the NHS now than what Milliband said Labour would. The only difference is a growing economy helps support this. We can do without yet another borrowing binge as this would be reckless for the public services that we all depend on. The tories won’t get any credit for this in the media though!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. wordydan says:

    Interesting read. I gave this a good read after a friend suggested it; whilst I do agree with some of the incentive behind your points, I think reality is quite different under this current government.

    I’d like to quote you as to why I am voting Labour: “If the government pisses us off we can simply get rid of them at the next election.”

    Obviously this doesn’t exactly widen your perspective on current affairs dramatically but I’m almost certain that your quote summarises many voter’s views during this election.

    Keep writing, you’re good at it – continue broadening your scope on world events, but not just politics; for instance a few years ago a charity team and I went to Calais to give aid to the refugees there and that experience changed me. Oppurtunities like these will help you make your mind up on what’s going on in the world and what you can do to help. Remember the real people.

    Good luck! And well done on your article, I’ll definitely read more of your work.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Michael Allen says:

    Fantastic post Emily! Thank you for validating my vote for the Conservatives! I have been vilified by friends who voted labour, and not once have I criticised their decision for their vote. It seems labour voters want everything handed out on a plate to them without any care of how it will be paid for. Thanks again for a great post! 👍

    Liked by 1 person

  22. halbaldo says:

    Really refreshing to actually see the fellow young voices of conservatism being expressed! Informative and succinct little post, really underlining the core values of what it means to be a traditional social conservative, even if the current party is aligned rather questionably with them. Will keep on eye out!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Nay says:

    How do you feel about doctors, who work for years in school to get the best grades, then 5 years in university, then nights and weekends in hospital being paid wages way below market rate?

    Like

      • Nay says:

        But the tory line has always been to underpay those who serve in public interest. Doctors, police, the armed forces. All are paid less than they would be in the US, for example, despite the equal qualifications and higher living costs. The previous MP doctors (Sarah Wollaston, Liam Fox) were both GPs and therefore worked in private practice; no MP has worked as a hospital doctor.

        Jeremy Hunt is a puppet. His orders come from higher up; hence why he’s been in post longer than any other cabinet minister. It’s coming from the 1922, not Jeremy himself.

        Like

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